Invisible Maps.

Una iniciativa para localizar y hacer visible el patrimonio inmaterial de la ciudad. A través del tiempo y los años la ciudad ha cambiado mucho, cada capa nueva transforma y oculta la anterior. La participación ciudadana entonces toma un nuevo valor: el objetivo es recuperar los recuerdos ocultos en la memoria de la gente, miles de fragmentos que se recomponen y ubican en la ciudad dejándonos comprender mejor el entorno urbano que nos rodea.

Invisible Maps plantea una visión de Barcelona centrada en esta participación, destacando los hechos y lugares que han marcado profundamente las experiencias personales. De esta manera, crea un mapa del patrimonio invisible de la ciudad.

Por su parte, el uso de códigos QR ofrece la oportunidad de interactuar con el territorio y su historia a través de la tecnología móvil. En los talleres, te mostraremos como participar creando tus propios códigos para transformar tus experiencias personales en contenidos digitales, vinculando tu interior con el exterior de la ciudad. Todo será accesible desde la plataforma online, vía ordenador o móvil, pero lo mejor es que la calle volverá a ser protagonista de sus historias …

… A few methods of mapping time and space that I am interested in exploring in my own work:

“Solidarity Map” AREA Chicago 2006 - methodology: the power of naming places

“Superimpositions” Dan Mills 2007 method: scale comparison of Iraq and United States – this also reminds me of the power of the If It Were My Home Oil Spill Map.


“A Historical, Chronological and Genealogical Chart” Bostwick method: mapping geographical location with change over time.


“Evolution Charts” Loewy 1933 method: mapping change in forms over time.


“Los Angeles Urban Rangers Official Map and Guide” LA Urban Rangers 2004 method: subverting conventional NPS map symbology


“Memory Map” Ellis Nadler 2007 method: drawing things as we remember or imagine them — which reminds me that I need to add Kevin Lynch to my reading list.


“Polish American System of Chronology” Elizabeth Palmer Peabody 1850 method: total geometric abstraction of time.

“Water Line” Maya Lin 2002 method: showing 2-d representational methods in 3-d.

Libro A Cidade dos Barrios

… la publicación de A Cidade dos Barrios. El libro sirve de registro de las acciones desarrolladas en ocho barrios de la ciudad y reflexiona sobre las posibilidades de intervención y las percepciones de los ciudadanos de A Coruña. Paralelamente toda la documentación utilizada en esta investigación será accesible desde la web. Además de las encuestas a nivel urbano y de barrio, será posible descargar los datos en bruto y la mayoría de los mapas. Por otro lado, muchos de los gráficos serán visibles también a través de Google Earth e Ikimap. A la publicación se accederá a través de Issuu distinguiendo cada uno de los apartados del libro. Una vez más queremos agradecer a las más de 90 personas que durante este año participaron directamente en esta Plataforma y a todos aquellos ciudadanos que contribuyeron al desarrollo de la iniciativa expresando sus deseos para mejorar la ciudad.

[en mmasa blog]

CrisisCommons is a global network of volunteers who use creative problem solving and open technologies to help people and communities in times and places of crisis. We seek not only coders, programmers, geospatial and visualization ninjas but collaborative, smart and savvy folks who can lead teams, manage projects, search the internet, translate languages, apply intuitive and universal access interfaces. We embrace innovation and open systems. We believe an idea can change the world. As they say, it takes a village. Won’t you join our tribe?

Cultura digital e geolocalização: a arte ante o contexto técnico-político. Karla Schuch Brunet & Juan Freire 

Maio 2010 

VI ENECULT. Encontro de estudos multidisciplinares em cultura organizado por la Faculdade de Comunicação - Universidade Federal da Bahia 
http://www.enecult.ufba.br/

Meet the geodesigner - Architect Magazine
Loosely defined as the integration of geographic analysis and tools into the design process, the term “geodesign,” while not proprietarily linked to ESRI, is viewed as part of the company’s lexicon by the geospatial community, broadly composed of urban planners, cartographers, geographers and other social scientists, and emergency response and military analysts, among others. Geodesign, as Dangermond sees it, is shorthand for the complex interrelationship of spatial data and architecture. It is the interface between land use, census blocks, traffic patterns, air quality tables, and any other data set, on the one hand, and the process of building—site planning, conceptual design, programming, and construction drawings—on the other.

Meet the geodesigner - Architect Magazine

Loosely defined as the integration of geographic analysis and tools into the design process, the term “geodesign,” while not proprietarily linked to ESRI, is viewed as part of the company’s lexicon by the geospatial community, broadly composed of urban planners, cartographers, geographers and other social scientists, and emergency response and military analysts, among others. Geodesign, as Dangermond sees it, is shorthand for the complex interrelationship of spatial data and architecture. It is the interface between land use, census blocks, traffic patterns, air quality tables, and any other data set, on the one hand, and the process of building—site planning, conceptual design, programming, and construction drawings—on the other.

It all began with a lunch. Tim Berners-Lee, the father of the world wide web, was invited to Chequers in spring 2009. A government taskforce had just published a report aimed at making Britain a digital world leader and technological reform was in the air. Even so, Berners-Lee was surprised at what came next. “The prime minister asked me what Britain should do in order to make the best use of the internet,” he told Prospect in early January. “I said, you should put all your government data onto the web. And he said, let’s do it.” A month later, Berners-Lee flew in from his base at MIT in Boston for a meeting, this time a cup of tea with Brown in the garden at No 10. He brought with him his friend and colleague Nigel Shadbolt, a professor of artificial intelligence at Southampton University, who works on next generation web technology and has piloted his work on public data. Sitting in wicker chairs, they hatched a plan for a new government team, led by Berners-Lee, to unlock Britain’s public data.

On 21st January this year, less than 12 months later, the government launched a website to do just that (you may have seen the television adverts). Modelled on a similar effort by President Obama, data.gov.uk brings together over 2,500 public data sets, ranging from abandoned vehicles and A&E stats to child tax credits and carbon indicators. And Brown has promised, in a few months’ time, to open up the jewel in Britain’s data crown: the maps made by Ordnance Survey…

EPA interactive map of environmental enforcement actions

Map of all civil and criminal enforcement actions (2009)

This interactive map shows information on enforcement actions and cases from 2009. They include civil enforcement actions taken at facilities, criminal cases prosecuted under federal statutes and the U.S. Criminal Code, and cases in which EPA provided significant support to cases prosecuted under state criminal laws…

Vía Treehugger.

Crisis Mappers from around the world have been working around the clock to create maps and other tools for relief workers in Haiti. The earthquake caused tremendous damage to the road network and updated maps are necessary to enable food and volunteers to traverse the island.

The volunteer-driven Open Street Map project has become a central data source for the Crisis Mappers. It is regarded by many as the most up-to-date map of the area. It combines UN damage assessment, digitized imagery, Public Domain Topos and other base data. In the wake of the tragedy Google quickly released Haiti data gathered from its MapMaker programDigitalGlobe has made itssatellite imagery of Haiti freely available as well (as did GeoEye).

Shortly there will be a free iPhone app with maps of Haiti coming to the App Store. Andrew Johnson and Jeffrey Johnson (no relation) have adapted an existing iPhone app (www.gaiagps.com) to provide offline maps to for relief workers. It combines Digital Globe (1m resolution), GeoEye (.5m resolution updated on 1/13), and OpenStreetMap (constantly being updated).

This version of Gaia GPS is intended to aid disaster relief for the Haitian earthquake. The app can be used to download maps and satellite imagery of the earthquake area, including up-to-date overlays of disaster sites, hospitals, and other relevant waypoints. The map data is provided by Digital Globe, GeoEye, OpenStreetMap, and the maps are hosted by the New York Public Library. 

The app also provides other features that might be relevant to disaster relief efforts: 

1) Recording of GPS tracks, waypoints, and geo-tagged photos 
2) Import/export GPX tracks and photos 
3) Guidance to waypoints and along tracks.