The Creativity Compass. Joi Ito
… artist and scientists tend to work well together, and designers and engineers work well together, but that scientists and engineers don’t work as well together, and likewise, neither do artists and designers. Engineers and designers tend to focus on utility and understand the world through observation and gathering the constraints of a problem to come up with a solution. Artists and scientists, on the other hand are inspired by nature or math, and they create through pure inner creativity and pursue expression that is more connected to things like truth or beauty than something so imperfect as mere utility. Which is to say, there are many more ways to divide the brain than into left and right hemispheres.
…
The tyranny of traditional disciplines and functionally segregated organizations fail to produce the type of people who can work with this creativity compass, but I believe that in a world where the rate of change increases exponentially, where disruption has become a norm instead of an anomaly, the challenge will be to think this way if we want to effectively solve the problems we face today, much less tomorrow.

The Creativity Compass. Joi Ito

… artist and scientists tend to work well together, and designers and engineers work well together, but that scientists and engineers don’t work as well together, and likewise, neither do artists and designers. Engineers and designers tend to focus on utility and understand the world through observation and gathering the constraints of a problem to come up with a solution. Artists and scientists, on the other hand are inspired by nature or math, and they create through pure inner creativity and pursue expression that is more connected to things like truth or beauty than something so imperfect as mere utility. Which is to say, there are many more ways to divide the brain than into left and right hemispheres.

The tyranny of traditional disciplines and functionally segregated organizations fail to produce the type of people who can work with this creativity compass, but I believe that in a world where the rate of change increases exponentially, where disruption has become a norm instead of an anomaly, the challenge will be to think this way if we want to effectively solve the problems we face today, much less tomorrow.

barrabesnext

barrabesnext:

… Rather, this building, at 1205 Manhattan Avenue, has been sliced and diced into several dozen small factories, each with a niche clientele. One forges exhibits out of wood and metal for the city’s museums. Another makes props and models for advertisers of products like Absolut Vodka to use in their magazine photo spreads. A third restores stained-glass masterpieces for museums like the Cloisters.

This is the face of manufacturing in 2012 Brooklyn…

But in a shift that has been both celebrated and parodied, Brooklyn is increasingly retaining some of its remaining industrial spaces for small-scale, small-batch manufacturing…

“We think this is the future of urban manufacturing,” said Brian T. Coleman, chief executive of Greenpoint Manufacturing and Design Center, a nonprofit group that has bought four weathered industrial buildings and converted them into lofts for small factories housing 110 businesses with 500 employees.

“There is a highly skilled work force making products for local consumption,” he said …

Marty Markowitz, the Brooklyn borough president, said Brooklyn “is going back to the future.”

“What is emerging is the artisanal approach rather than the mass production for millions of items of something,” he said.

…  three types of work: “I work,” which requires expertise, concentration and focus; “You & I work,” which involves relatively simple collaboration among two people; and “We work,” which embodies the highest level of content and context complexity, from multi-disciplinary expertise to multi-location and multi-technology platforms.

… Organizations can address this problem by redesigning their workspaces around the following principles:

  1. Focus on four main activities. Employees need to have areas for concentrated work (such as unassigned individual workstations), emergent social exchange (free-flowing hallways), learning (rooms equipped with technology and tools), and collaboration (group spaces for co-creation). The key is to make sure the different types of spaces are integrated with each other and open to all, so people can freely choose where to be based on what they’re doing.
  2. Vary the size of workspaces, and the technology with which they’re equipped. Collaborative work happens best in spaces that accommodate a group of four to eight people physically or virtually or in a larger team space with multiple small pods where people can still see each other. It’s also important to give everyone equal access to on-line and on-site information.
  3. Provide collaborative tools. Effective collaboration involves knowledge exchange, brainstorming, the inclusion of diverse perspectives, and scenario building. Companies must therefore provide tools like whiteboards that allow employees to record ideas and create a visual, side-by-side review of alternative solutions. Such tools are key enablers helping groups reach a shared understanding faster and more effectively.
  4. Give project teams a dedicated space. The concept of ‘distributed cognition’ suggests that thinking processes are embedded in the physical work environment. A team room can provide “cognitive space” to hold ideas and experiences. Returning to the same workspace each day, keeping meeting notes on the board, and leaving work samples and half-finished prototypes on tables between meetings can help teammates maintain a shared project mindset, sharpening their focus and speeding up the collaborative process.

… The value of community and serendipity is what’s driving the wild-fire emergence of hybrid workspaces in Boston, Cambridge and Somerville. In places like Artisan’s Asylum, experimentation and entrepreneurship intersect, engineers work next to artists and their collaborations fuel creativity …

Entrepreneurs who aren’t lucky enough to catch the eye of a venture capital firm on their own can compete for MassChallenge’s annual one-million-dollar prize. The money is just a nominal motivator; the real rewards are the networking opportunities and office resources allocated to some 125 startups selected to share a 27,000-square-foot floor, donated by developer Joe Fallon, in a Fan Pier high-rise. Started in 2010 by business school graduates John Harthorne and Akhil Nigam, MassChallenge’s hodgepodge of startups gets mentors from partner organizations and rare access to top investors. The office is a beehive of activity, where finalists work alongside peers with projects in a range of high-growth industries. They have use of legal advice, office cubes and a whiteboard so massive it’s being certified by Guinness World Records. Collaborations range from a biotech developing treatments for blindness to a company that delivers artisanal wines to customers’ homes. And for motivation, the entrepreneurs just need to look out their floor-to-ceiling windows on the waterfront to imagine themselves as masters of the universe.

Academia, too, is seeing a new generation of workspaces, like the Harvard i-lab (Hi for short) in the Allston building that was formerly home to WGBH. Director Gordon Jones describes the i-lab, which opened last November, as a startup, an experiment in bringing together students and resources from schools across the university. Harvard students have access to the center’s classes and its experts, but retain rights to their own intellectual property. The center also hosts workshops like “Startup Secrets: Company Formation,” taught by venture capitalist Michael Skok, with some of the seats reserved for the public. A circular open-floor plan, exposed ceiling and IdeaPainted surfaces sprinkled with inspirational quotes evoke the dorm rooms and hacker spaces that might lure the next Mark Zuckerberg, and maybe even keep him from dropping out this time. 

“Part of what this is about,” Jones says, “even in the building design, is high modularity. It’s intentionally unfinished. This is about all of us building this place together.” Instead of an office, Jones sits in an approachable, small cubicle. The intermixing of people who wouldn’t have met in a traditional classroom pays off. For example, a biology graduate’s thoughts on natural selection influenced a business school student’s theories on company performance …

Whereas Cambridge’s coworking spaces, both academic and industry, tend to be tech-oriented, Somerville’s workspaces are more community-driven. “It’s not about making millions of dollars,” Graney says. She started the Design Annex, a 1,400-foot center housed in Union Square’s former police station, so that designers of all stripes, who would normally work out of their home, would have 24/7 access to a place free from domestic interruptions. Since the Annex is part of a global network, members, for the price of a monthly gym membership, can use workspaces or conference rooms to conduct meetings anywhere in the world.


While Annexers tend to be designers already established in their careers, another building houses a panoply of fledgling businesses. Located in a 4,400-square-foot warehouse set back from the street, Fringe comprises 20 people and 16 companies—ranging from cult brewery Pretty Things Beer & Ale Project to a roof-garden business, Recover Green Roofs. There are coworking days when Fringe opens its brightly colored conference room to people looking for a place to work, and even provides them with free coffee. Businesses pay for space per square foot, and they can partition and decorate their offices to any taste. Custom-bike builders have a utilitarian shop next to a space shared by a video producer and studio photographer, which is overseen by a salvaged piece of Shepard Fairey street art depicting Andre the Giant. Every business is deliberately different, as meticulously curated as if it were part of an art exhibition …

Entre julio y noviembre de 2009, los estadounidenses Joshua Glenn y Rob Walker llevaron a cabo el proyecto Significant objects. El objetivo: probar que un objeto con una historia vale más que un objeto sin ella. Para el experimento invitaron a cien reconocidos escritores, Whitehead, Jonathan Lethem o Bruce Sterling entre ellos. Cada uno debía inventar una historia para un objeto viejo comprado en el portal eBay. El resultado fue contundente: las baratijas compradas en eBay por un total de 128,74 dólares fueron vendidas por un 3.612,51 dólares. El valor añadido de las historias fue donado posteriormente a causas sociales. ¿Cuánto cuestan unas mini botas de metal? 3 dólares. ¿Cuánto valen las botas si pertenecieron a unos soldados aventureros de Sicilia que se embarcaron en la Guerra Civil de Estados Unidos (historia inventada por Bruce Sterling)? 86 dólares. La narración de la epopeya, la emoción generada, cuestan 83 dólares …

Calles = objetos compartidos. Y ahora llega la vuelta de tuerca Objetos-Ciudades. ¿Por qué no consideramos una calle, una plaza o una avenida como un objeto, como un spime de historias compartidas y escondidas? En un momento en el que algunas instituciones o marcas apenas hablan de una Internet de las cosas de objetos conectados con sensores, de datos controlados verticalmente, las Historias de las cosas cocinadas conjuntamente pueden jugar un papel vital. De nuevo, la tecnología necesaria es asustadoramente básica. Podemos abrir una entrada en la Wikipedia para un rincón / calle / parque de una ciudad. Después, creamos un código QR para dicha entrada con la herramienta gratuita QR Pedia. Una vez colocado en el espacio físico serán los ciudadanos los que creen una narración colectiva (suma de narraciones individuales) sobre dicho lugar. Parece inevitable: las instituciones o marcas tendrán cada vez más difícil imponer narrativas sobre lugares concretos. La voz ciudadana se va a elevar. Y la ciudades, bosques o islas se irán transformando colectivamente gracias a un procomún de historias…

Y aquí llegamos a otro detalle crucial: las narraciones están adoptando formatos híbridos, mutantes, imprevisibles. Un mapa elaborado colaborativamente con la herramienta WhatIf de Ecosistema Urbano es una narración colectiva. Una serie de tweets alrededor de un hashtag es un relato colectivo. El sonido de una plaza (voces, gritos, música), grabado y subido a la red, puede ser un tipo de relato. El proyecto HistoryPin, que yuxtapone en google maps fotos antiguas y recientes vinculando personas del presente gracias al pasado, es una narración colectiva. Y basta colocar un código escaneable muy pronto ni si quiera hará falta código en el espacio físico que nos traslade a un sitio de Internet para completar el círculo de los relatos del procomún …

Y las narraciones serán las articulaciones básicas para esa ciudad relacional de “lugares y redes” de la que habla el antropólogo Michel Agier. Las historias compartidas, en la ciudad fragmentada, deterritorializada, pueden ser una argamasa tan sólida como las relaciones de parentesco. Pueden acabar incluso sustituyéndolas. Las historias son aquellos hilos que los habitantes de Ersilia, una ciudad invisible inventada por Italo Calvino, colocaban entre las casas de la urbe. Los hilos eran blancos o negros o grises o blanquinegros dependiendo de las relaciones de parentesco, intercambio, autoridad o representación. Cuando los hilos eran tantos que ya no se podía pasar por en medio, contaba Calvino, los habitantes se marchaban: las casas se desmontaban. Apenas quedaban los hilos. Y luego construían en otro lugar una nueva ciudad imitando la telaraña de relaciones.

Las historias colectivas son los nuevos hilos. Las lianas compartidas que quiebran muros, fronteras invisibles, segregaciones étnicas. Da igual el color que tengan estas viejas-nuevas historias, porque son narraciones colectivas, compartidas. Pero en lugar de molestar los tránsitos, las narraciones-hilos conforman el esqueleto, la columna vertebral, las extremidades y el corazón de las ciudades del procomún. Por eso es importante construir relatos como sugiere el colectivo de escritores italiano Wu Ming como si fueran espacios para ser habitados. Por eso hay que construir calles o plazas como si fueran narraciones colectivas, como si fueran párrafos insustituibles de un imaginario superior que da sentido a la nada.

Restricciones y diseño

Diego Rodríguez en su blog Metacool:

1. Cita del arquitecto Joshua Prince-Ramus:

'We're seeing constraints as opportunities. It's not like we're getting around the constraints. We're saying, “The project's just the constraints.” If we can solve the constraints, that's where the form will come, that's where the beauty will come, that's where the logic will come. And more likely than not, you can get it built, you can get it financed, you can get it on budget.'

2. Charles Eames en "Design Q&A":

Q. Does the creation of design admit constraint?
A. Design depends largely on constraints.
Q. What constraints?
A. The sum of all constraints. Here is one of the few effective keys to the design problem-the ability of the designer to recognize as many of the constraints as possible-his willingness and enthusiasm for working within these constraints-the constraints of price, of size, of strength, balance, of surface, of time, etc.; each problem has its own peculiar list.
Q. Does design obey laws?
A. Aren’t constraints enough?

  1. La música ahora es una industria basada en la suscripción
  2. Los móviles han desbancado a las cámaras de fotos
  3. La descarga y el streaming de videojuegos es tan simple como para las películas
  4. Las tarjetas de crédito están al borde de la desaparición
  5. Se acabó viajar en hoteles
  6. Los productos de diseño ya son accesibles
  7. Las clases online ya son una realidad
  8. Las recaudaciones de fondos tradicionales están desapareciendo
  9. El almacenamiento físico está muerto
  10. Ya no tienes que ser un fotógrafo profesional para hacer buenas fotos
  11. Las grandes compañías también están apostando por la colaboración social
… ahora lo realmente importante es el diseño de la empresa y nosotros solo diseñamos objetos, no empresas. Pero Zara es un concepto, Ikea es un concepto, Decathlon también, o Apple, y nuestras empresas no tienen el empuje que deben tener, una palabra que remite a la necesidad de emprender

André Ricart “uno de los padres del diseño industrial español” y que acaba de ser nombrado miembro de la Real Academia de Ciencias y Artes de Barcelona.

En El diseño entra en los salones (El País).

My topic is the shift from ‘architect’ to ‘gardener’, where ‘architect’ stands for ‘someone who carries a full picture of the work before it is made’, to ‘gardener’ standing for ‘someone who plants seeds and waits to see exactly what will come up’. I will argue that today’s composer are more frequently ‘gardeners’ than ‘architects’ and, further, that the ‘composer as architect’ metaphor was a transitory historical blip.