Francisco, B., Hanna, D., & David, I. (2010). Educational Research and Innovation The Nature of Learning: Using Research to Inspire Practice. OECD.

Future Work Skills 2020 [pdf]. 2011. Institute for the Future for the University of Phoenix Research Institute. www.iftf.org

 Jones, B., & Goff, M. (2011). Learning to live with data deluge and what that means for educators. Teoría de la Educación: Educación y Cultura en la Sociedad de la Información, 12(1), 9–27.

Mills, K. A. (2010). A Review of the “Digital Turn” in the New Literacy StudiesReview of Educational Research80(2), 246.

Heimeriks, G., van den Besselaar, P., & Frenken, K. (2008). Digital disciplinary differences: An analysis of computer-mediated science and ‘Mode 2′ knowledge productionResearch Policy37(9), 1602-1615. doi:16/j.respol.2008.05.012

Hofer, A. R., & Potter, J. (2010). Universities, Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Criteria and Examples of Good Practice [pdf]. OECD Local Economic and Employment Development (LEED) Working Papers.

Werquin, P. (2010). Recognition of non-formal and informal learning: country practices [pdf].Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques OCDE. Paris. [ppt]

… ha creado su escuela rogue (pícaro) de cine, una “experiencia intensa” donde la lista de lecturas obligadas incluyen las Geórgicas de Virgilio, “en latín a ser posible”; poesía islándesa clásica; Historia verdadera de la conquista de la nueva España, el libro de Bernal Díaz del Castillo, cronista de Indias y ayudante de Hernán Cortes, o el informe de la comisión Warren. Además de solicitar a sus estudiantes que vayan andando a este “circo ambulante” que es su escuela y que, como anuncia en su web (www.roguefilmschool.com), no enseña nada de técnica relacionada con hacer cine. “Para eso que vayan a su academia local”, zanja Herzog.

… some of the innovations brought to market by the Khan Academy.  Among others:

  • free access over the internet
  • self-paced learning
  • lecture attendance at home, homework at school
  • the psychological and emotional safety created by learning in private
  • helping students achieve true mastery, as opposed to minimum tolerable levels of understanding
  • liberating “slow” students from the tyrranny of being put on the low achievement track
  • a more human classroom experience

Archinect: Venice #10: Street Training
London-based artist Lottie Child led a group of people, mostly children, who live and work around Via Garibaldi in Venice, in a Street Training session for architects and planners. Inverting educational hierarchies, with adult professionals being trained by children in imaginative responses to the built environment, the session explored the relations between the built infrastructure and the social infrastructure in terms of safety and joy.With less than 5 playgrounds in Venice, the children occupy the streets. Lottie initially embarked on her research by asking the questions, “How do you feel safe in the streets?” and “How do you feel joyful in the streets?” Many people had answers to the first question, as fear mediated their experiences, but only the children had ideas on strategies for joy. Lottie decided to apprentice herself to the children, and here she brings to us some of her research: joyfulness in the streets of Venice…

Archinect: Venice #10: Street Training

London-based artist Lottie Child led a group of people, mostly children, who live and work around Via Garibaldi in Venice, in a Street Training session for architects and planners. Inverting educational hierarchies, with adult professionals being trained by children in imaginative responses to the built environment, the session explored the relations between the built infrastructure and the social infrastructure in terms of safety and joy.

With less than 5 playgrounds in Venice, the children occupy the streets. Lottie initially embarked on her research by asking the questions, “How do you feel safe in the streets?” and “How do you feel joyful in the streets?” Many people had answers to the first question, as fear mediated their experiences, but only the children had ideas on strategies for joy. Lottie decided to apprentice herself to the children, and here she brings to us some of her research: joyfulness in the streets of Venice…

http://www.slideshare.net/trebor/social-media-for-higher-education-1146290

The Public School (http://nyc.thepublicschool.org/)

University of the People (http://www.uopeople.org/)

University of Openess (http://uo.twenteenthcentury.com/)

Copenhagen Free University
(http://www.copenhagenfreeuniversity.dk/index.html)

Manoa Free University (http://manoafreeuniversity.org/)

EduFactory (http://www.edu-factory.org/)

Radical Education Collective (http://radical.temp.si/)

Free Slow University of Warsaw (http://www.wuw2009.pl/index.php?lang=eng)

Toronto School of Creativity & Inquiry (http://www.tsci.ca/)

Ahora que tanto se habla de la “crisis del libro”, paradójicamente las bibliotecas se están convirtiendo en los espacios más vitales del sistema educativo. Quizás por ser los “espacios expandidos” dentro de las instituciones (y quizás por que las instituciones no les prestan demasiada atención):

Son xa máis de cento sesenta as fiestras abertas ás bibliotecas escolares galegas, blogues que serven para a difusión da enorme actividade que xeneran estes espazos educativos e a diversidade de programas e iniciativas dos centros aos que apoian cos seus recursos. 

Graduate education is the Detroit of higher learning. Most graduate programs in American universities produce a product for which there is no market (candidates for teaching positions that do not exist) and develop skills for which there is diminishing demand (research in subfields within subfields and publication in journals read by no one other than a few like-minded colleagues), all at a rapidly rising cost (sometimes well over $100,000 in student loans).