1. La música ahora es una industria basada en la suscripción
  2. Los móviles han desbancado a las cámaras de fotos
  3. La descarga y el streaming de videojuegos es tan simple como para las películas
  4. Las tarjetas de crédito están al borde de la desaparición
  5. Se acabó viajar en hoteles
  6. Los productos de diseño ya son accesibles
  7. Las clases online ya son una realidad
  8. Las recaudaciones de fondos tradicionales están desapareciendo
  9. El almacenamiento físico está muerto
  10. Ya no tienes que ser un fotógrafo profesional para hacer buenas fotos
  11. Las grandes compañías también están apostando por la colaboración social

Un año más desde gencat blog presentan las predicciones para 2012 sobre Administración y redes sociales.

1. Incremento de los concursos de aplicaciones a partir de datos públicos. Especial atención a las aplicaciones relacionadas con el transporte público.

2. Adaptación a web móvil, y navegación por tabletas de las webs municipales. Así como sus versiones para Facebook.

3. Primeras iniciativas de información a partir de los canales de Messenger y WhatsApp. Información instantánea y directa agrupada por intereses y / o personalizada.

4. Integración del Códigos QR en grandes equipamientos, edificios públicos y espacios singulares.

5. Ampliación de grandes zonas wifi en espacios públicos, con especial atención a las zonas deportivas o espacios sociales.

6. Twitter como canal de referencia para emergencias, avisos, señalizaciones, etc. Las etiquetas que se utilizan habitualmente generarán auténticas comunidades de usuarios agrupados por intereses.

7. Smarts cities en smart citizens. El concepto de ciudades inteligentes evolucionará hacia el de ciudadanos inteligentes, favoreciendo propuestas de innovación de abajo a arriba.

8. Plataformas municipales para la participación ciudadana. Para aprovechar la iniciativa de los ciudadanos, la administración ofrecerá y dinamizará plataformas para que la creatividad para encontrar soluciones tecnológicas a los nuevos retos tenga espacios donde hacerlo.

But there are many parts of this country where manufacturing is very much alive, albeit in a different form. The monolithic industry model — steel, oil, lumber, cars — has evolved into something more nimble and diversified…

<…

As Mark Dwight, who started SFMade in 2010, explains, “For decades we have developed a culture of disposability — from consumer goods to medical instruments and machine tools. To fuel economic growth, marketers replaced longevity with planned obsolescence — and our mastery of technology has given birth to ever-accelerating unplanned obsolescence. I think there is increasing awareness that this is no longer sustainable on the scale we have developed.”

<…

Things made in places like San Francisco or New York command a desire-by-association (though I’m also sure creative individuals in less name-brand locals could adopt many of the business synergies and sustainable efforts discussed here). To be sure, there may be a higher cost of doing business in major metropolitan centers like these, but at the same time what gets made is largely driven by design and by consumer demand. ..

We’re living in a stylistic tropics. There’s a whole generation of people able to access almost anything from almost anywhere, and they don’t have the same localised stylistic sense that my generation grew up with. It’s all alive, all “now,” in an ever-expanding present, be it Hildegard of Bingen or a Bollywood soundtrack. The idea that something is uncool because it’s old or foreign has left the collective consciousness.

I think this is good news. As people become increasingly comfortable with drawing their culture from a rich range of sources—cherry-picking whatever makes sense to them—it becomes more natural to do the same thing with their social, political and other cultural ideas. The sharing of art is a precursor to the sharing of other human experiences, for what is pleasurable in art becomes thinkable in life.

Los factores económicos, sociales y tecnológicos actuales están promoviendo el cambio de paradigma en los sistemas de innovación:

- Globalización … Pérdida de competitividad … Democratización de las tecnologías … Usuarios más exigentes

Diversos investigadores mantienen diferentes perspectivas sobre qué es exactamente la innovación abierta y qué áreas funcionales de la empresa abarca. Desde el grupo de investigación OBEA de Mondragon UnibertsitateaMIK hemos conseguido unificar todas esas diferentes perspectivas en cuatro escenarios.

- intraorganizacional … interorganizacional … de usuario … colectiva

A Writing Revolution § Seed Magazine
Number of authors who published in each year for various media since 1400 by century (left) and by year (right). Our prediction for the imminent future appears as the extrapolation of the Twitter-author curve (dashed line). The horizontal scale of time has one grid line per century (left) or per year (right). The first blog appeared in 1997; Facebook was launched in 2004; Twitter, in 2006. Note that the colored curves on the right have roughly the same steepness as the black curve on the left, despite the hundred-fold increase in the time scale between left and right. This indicates that the new media are growing 100 times faster than books. The book-authors line is not really broken; it’s still growing at the same old rate, tenfold per century, but looks flat when plotted by year. The vertical scale is number of authors per year, as a count (left) or percent of the world’s population (right). The logarithmic vertical scaling, increasing by powers of 10, displays growth clearly because the same percentage increase is always represented by the same upward shift on the graph. Plotted with this scaling, many growth phenomena, including epidemics, produce straight lines, which are particularly easy to recognize and describe. (Click here for methodology and full list of sources.)

A Writing Revolution § Seed Magazine

Number of authors who published in each year for various media since 1400 by century (left) and by year (right). Our prediction for the imminent future appears as the extrapolation of the Twitter-author curve (dashed line). The horizontal scale of time has one grid line per century (left) or per year (right). The first blog appeared in 1997; Facebook was launched in 2004; Twitter, in 2006. Note that the colored curves on the right have roughly the same steepness as the black curve on the left, despite the hundred-fold increase in the time scale between left and right. This indicates that the new media are growing 100 times faster than books. The book-authors line is not really broken; it’s still growing at the same old rate, tenfold per century, but looks flat when plotted by year. The vertical scale is number of authors per year, as a count (left) or percent of the world’s population (right). The logarithmic vertical scaling, increasing by powers of 10, displays growth clearly because the same percentage increase is always represented by the same upward shift on the graph. Plotted with this scaling, many growth phenomena, including epidemics, produce straight lines, which are particularly easy to recognize and describe. (Click here for methodology and full list of sources.)

t the 2009 World Conference on Higher Education, the second such gathering convened by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (the first was in 1998) …

Philip G. Altbach, professor and director of Boston College’s Center for International Higher Education, presented Monday on a trend report prepared by the center at UNESCO’s request. The report is titled “Trends in Global Higher Education: Tracking an Academic Revolution.”

“It became clear to us that we are indeed in the middle of an almost unprecedented revolution in higher education — not just small changes around the edges, but fundamental changes. And our job in the trend report — and I think in this conference as well — is to try to understand and then deal with, in constructive ways, the nature of this revolution. It’s different, ladies and gentlemen, from what’s gone on before,” Altbach said during a plenary session …

… “At the last UNESCO World Conference, just a decade ago, there were about 100 million students enrolled in all aspects of postsecondary education around the globe. Now there are somewhere around 150 million. One of the key elements of this revolution is what we call massification, which has profound and deep implications for everything that we do.”…

Altbach also pointed to the huge growth of private higher education — 30 percent of enrollments globally are now in private institutions — and the privatization of public universities, which are increasingly being asked to generate their own funding. He cited, too, strains on academic staffing that have come about as a consequence of massification: “The rise of part-time academics, decreased average qualifications for academics in many parts of the world, a tremendous strain on the work life of the professoriate, are all realities that we need to understand, deal with and hopefully ameliorate. Because without a committed academic profession, we will not have successful higher education institutions.”

Corporations often have an alphabet soup of executives, but they don’t have anyone to decipher the most complex problem of all: culture. Grant McCracken, an advisor to some of the world’s leading companies and consulting firms, argues that every company needs a Chief Culture Officer—or suffer the competitive consequences.

McCracken urges corporations to stop outsourcing culture to trend hunters, cool watchers, marketing experts, and consulting firms. He argues that the CCO will keep a finger on the pulse of fast-moving trends while developing a real understanding of the deep waves that move culture in America and the world. For corporations that must excel in the marketplace and individuals who want to financially make good use of their cultural knowledge, Chief Culture Officer will establish new standards for how business makes its way in the world.