Organizational charts: The comic is a set of 6 organizational charts, edges with arrows show who reports to whom. Amazon’s is very traditional, each manager has exactly 2 people below her. Google’s is colorful (nodes are colored red, green, yellow, blue) and is extremely messy. Edges are overlapping all over the place, it’s unclear who reports to whom. Facebook looks like a social network with bidirectional arrows and a distributed structure. Microsoft’s is divided in three sub-structures that are pointing guns at each other. Apple’s is a circle with a large red dot in the center, and everyone around it reports to that red dot — the arrow heads are particularly large and even the people two levels away from the center red dot also have arrows point at them coming directly from the red dot. Oracle’s is divided into two sections, the first section is labelled ‘Legal’ and is huge, the second section is labelled ‘Engineering’ and is tiny.

Organizational charts: The comic is a set of 6 organizational charts, edges with arrows show who reports to whom. Amazon’s is very traditional, each manager has exactly 2 people below her. Google’s is colorful (nodes are colored red, green, yellow, blue) and is extremely messy. Edges are overlapping all over the place, it’s unclear who reports to whom. Facebook looks like a social network with bidirectional arrows and a distributed structure. Microsoft’s is divided in three sub-structures that are pointing guns at each other. Apple’s is a circle with a large red dot in the center, and everyone around it reports to that red dot — the arrow heads are particularly large and even the people two levels away from the center red dot also have arrows point at them coming directly from the red dot. Oracle’s is divided into two sections, the first section is labelled ‘Legal’ and is huge, the second section is labelled ‘Engineering’ and is tiny.

Abstract. Geographically referenced user generated content provides us with an opportunity to, for the first time, gather perspectives on place over large areas by exploring how very many people describe information. We present a framework for analysing large collections of user generated content. This involves classification of descriptive terms attached by users to photographs into facets of elements, qualities, and activities. We apply this framework to two contrasting photographic archives — Flickr and Geograph, representing weakly and strongly moderated content respectively. We propose a method for removing user–generated bias from such collections though the user of term profiles that can assess the effect of the most and least prolific contributors to a collection. Analysis and visualization of co–occurrence between terms suggests clear differences in the description of place between the two collections, both in terms of the facets used and their geographical footprints. This is attributed to the role of moderation/editorialising of content; to the role tags and free–text have on descriptive behaviour and to the geographic footprint of content supplied by the two collections.

Interacciones entre usuarios #15M

… El estudio comprende el periodo de tiempo entre el 25 de abril y el 26 de mayo de 2011. A partir de las 70 palabras clave relacionadas con el movimiento 15M, se han rastreado todos los mensajes intercambiados entre usuarios que contenían una de éstas. En total se han detectado y utilizado 581.749 mensajes provenientes de 87.569 usuarios. Los datos aquí analizados representan un tercio aproximadamente de todos lo mensajes y posts…

(via 15m.bifi.es).

Instituto Universitario de Biocomputación y Física de Sistemas Complejos, Universidad de Zaragoza y Cierzo Development

Experiencias de “open data” e innovación abierta [Mesa redonda de Visualizar’11]

Materiales generados en la mesa redonda “Experiencias Open Data e innovación abierta” (más información aquí) celebrada en la EOI Escuela de Organización Industrial de Madrid el 5 de mayo, y que forma parte del programa Visualizar’11. Comprender las infraestructuras que organiza Medialab Prado con el apoyo de EOI.

En la mesa participaron Daniel Latorre desarrollador web del proyectoDNDzgz), Ruben Martín (responsable técnico en los proyectos de Open Data de la Fundación CTIC), y Alberto Ortiz de Zárate Tercero (responsable deOpen Data Euskadi, Departamento de Justicia y Administración Pública del Gobierno Vasco).

Vídeo captura del flujo de stream en Youtube: 

- Presentación de Rubén Martín en Slideshare: 

#opendata: Apertura y reutilización de datos públicos   

- Algunas fotos en Flickr

Protovis composes custom views of data with simple marks such as bars and dots. Unlike low-level graphics libraries that quickly become tedious for visualization, Protovis defines marks through dynamic properties that encode data, allowing inheritancescales and layouts to simplify construction.

Protovis is free and open-source, provided under the BSD License. It uses JavaScript and SVGfor web-native visualizations; no plugin required (though you will need a modern web browser)! Although programming experience is helpful, Protovis is mostly declarative and designed to be learned by example.

Sunlight Labs is pleased to announce our latest contest — “Design for America.” This 10 week long design and data visualization extravaganza is focused on connecting the talents of art and design communities throughout the country to the wealth of government data now available through bulk data access and APIs, and to help nurture the field of information visualization. Our goal is simple and straightforward — to make government data more accessible and comprehensible to the American public. We hope to enliven and engage new communities — just as we did with Apps for America 1 and 2 — as partners and participants in making government information more engaging to the American public. Our contest will end with a public announcement of the winners at Gov 2.0 Expo here in Washington, DC in May, in partnership with O’Reilly andTechWeb, and with a public gallery showing of the winners.

There’s an “artist” inside all of us so we’re creating multiple entry categories so that contestants have an opportunity to show off their skills wherever they are most comfortable. There’s room for all kinds of folks to participate — artists, data visualizers, specialists in info graphs and usability experts — to name a few.

Roger Martin: “The business world is full of two kinds of people—builders and traders. Over the past 20-30 years, traders have increasingly ruled. They receive the highest compensation. We need to tame the traders.”

Tim Brown: Paraphrase here—“We can use analytics to generate new questions, not just answers. Data visualization is very powerful.”